Monthly Archives: November 2013

New YouTube comment system integrated with Google+ now available

A better signal-to-noise ratio and more interaction with people you care about

Just as was promised back in September, YouTube is getting a new comment system based on Google+ with several new features. The new system will surface comments from people whose comments you care about most, such as your Google+ friends, the video maker, engaged commenters and other well-known YouTube personalities. Of course if you still want to see the flood of comments roll in, you can switch to "newest first" from "top comments."

One of the biggest bonuses in moving to Google+ for YouTube comments is being able to have a mix of private and public discussions on a single video. You can limit your comments to just specific circles or specific people, right alongside your public comments that everyone can see on the page.

A likely best of all if you're a YouTube video creator, you now have even better ways to moderate comments on your videos. You can review comments before they're made public, block certain words or auto-approve comments from specific people.

Subscribe to the Android Central YouTube Channel!

Source: YouTube Blog

    



Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/androidcentral/~3/ZIIOGwp3QKo/story01.htm
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Rare new microbe found in two spacecraft clean rooms

[unable to retrieve full-text content]A rare, recently discovered microbe that survives on very little to eat has been found in two places on Earth: spacecraft clean rooms in Florida and South America. Microbiologists often do thorough surveys of bacteria and other microbes in spacecraft clean rooms. Fewer microbes live there than in almost any other environment on Earth, but the surveys are important for knowing what might hitch a ride into space. If extraterrestrial life is ever found, it would be readily checked against the census of a few hundred types of microbes detected in spacecraft clean rooms.Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131106162631.htm
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McAuliffe Establishes Dems as Party of the Elites

By Tim Carney, Washington Examiner – November 5, 2013

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Source: http://www.realclearpolitics.com/2013/11/05/mcauliffe_establishes_dems_as_party_of_the_elites_319347.html
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Ted Borland: Full Part From Think Thank’s “Mind The Video Man”

Posted by: Evan Litsios / added: 11.05.2013 / Back to What Up

Think Thank is proud to release Mr. Ted “Bundy” Borland’s full part from last year’s release: “Mind The Video Man.” Ted’s super-consistent style owes itself to his ability to make very difficult and technical tricks look smooth and effortless. Not to mention that Ted is choosey with his tricks, always delivering a well-curated trick selection.

Bundy killed it in Mind The Video Man, and went even harder last season. If you haven’t seen Think Thank’s most recent release, “Brain Dead and Having a Heart Attack”, we strongly suggest you do.

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Source: http://www.frqncy.com/news/2013/11/05/ted-borland-full-part-from-think-thanks-mind-the-video-man?utm_campaign=blog_feed&utm_medium=feed&utm_source=feed_reader
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Google Helpouts aims to improve your life with the healing power of web video

Google Helpouts aims to improve your life with the healing power of web video

It’s like a Hangout, only with less loitering and more healing. Or something. After months of behind-the-scenes testing, Google’s launching Helpouts, a new service that leverages the company’s video offerings to pair users up with doctors, teachers, personal trainers and the like. Those professional life maker-betters need to list their credentials, as per the Hangout-powered service’s fine print, so you don’t wind up showing off that gaping shotgun wound to just any Joe Webcam (also, you should probably see a real life doctor. That looks infected). It should come as no surprise, too that the offering will be available on mobile devices, as well, so you embark on that pilates session on the bus to work. And once you’re all done, you can check out with Google Wallet.

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/11/05/google-helpouts-launch/?ncid=rss_truncated
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Imaging studies may predict tumor response to anti-angiogenic drugs

Imaging studies may predict tumor response to anti-angiogenic drugs

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

4-Nov-2013

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Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Study confirms that vascular normalization is the way these drugs improve patient survival

Advanced imaging techniques may be able to distinguish which patients’ tumors will respond to treatment with anti-angiogenic drugs and which will not. In patients newly diagnosed with the dangerous brain tumor glioblastoma, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers report, those for whom treatment with the anti-angiogenic drug cediranib rapidly ‘normalized’ abnormal blood vessels around their tumors and increased blood flow within tumors survived significantly longer than did patients in whom cediranib did not increase blood flow. The report appears in PNAS Early Edition.

“Two recent phase III trials of another anti-angiogenic drug, bevacizumab, showed no improvement in overall survival for glioblastoma patients, but our study suggests that only a subset of such patients will really benefit from these drugs,” explains Tracy Batchelor, MD, director of the Pappas Center for Neuro-Oncology at the MGH Cancer Center and co-lead and corresponding author of the current study. “Our results also verify that normalization of tumor vasculature appears to be the way that anti-angiogenic drugs enhance the activity of chemotherapy and radiation treatment.”

Anti-angiogenic drugs, which block the action of factors that stimulate the growth of blood vessels, were first introduced for cancer treatment under the theory that they would act by ‘starving’ tumors of their blood supply. Since that time, however, new evidence has suggested that the drugs’ benefits come through their ability to ‘normalize’ the abnormal, leaky vessels that usually surround and penetrate tumors, improving delivery of both chemotherapy drugs and the oxygen that is required for effective radiation therapy. This hypothesis was first proposed and has subsequently been developed by Rakesh Jain, PhD, senior author of the current study and director of the Steele Laboratory for Tumor Biology in the MGH Department of Radiation Oncology.

A 2007 clinical study led by Batchelor found evidence suggesting that cediranib, which has not yet received FDA approval, could temporarily normalize tumor vasculature in recurrent glioblastoma, but it was not clear what role normalization might have in patients’ survival. In the past few years, several research teams with leadership from Batchelor, Jain and other co-authors of the current paper reported evidence that cediranib alone improved blood perfusion within recurrent glioblastoma tumors in a subset of patients and improved their survival. A Nature Medicine study published earlier this year used a technique called vessel architectural imaging (VAI), developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH, to reveal that cediranib on its own improved the delivery of oxygen within tumors of some patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

Patients in the current study were participants in a clinical trial of cediranib plus radiation and chemotherapy for postsurgical treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Among participants in that trial, 40 also had advanced brain imaging with VAI and other MR imaging techniques. While all but one of the participants in the overall trial showed some evidence of vascular normalization and reduced edema tissue swelling that can be dangerous within the brain of the 40 who had imaging studies, only 20 were found to have persistent improvement in vessel perfusion. VAI also revealed improved oxygen delivery only in the patients with improved perfusion. Those patients ended up surviving about 9 months longer 26 months, compared with 17 months than did those whose perfusion levels remained stable or worsened. A comparison group of glioblastoma patients treated with radiation and chemotherapy only survived an average of 14 months.

“It’s quite likely that the results we’ve found with cediranib will apply to other anti-angiogenics,” Batchelor says. “In fact a presentation at a recent meeting showed that patients with improved perfusion from bevacizumab were also the ones in that study who lived longer. More research is needed, but these findings suggest that MR imaging techniques should play an essential role in future studies of anti-angiogenic drugs in glioblastoma and possibly other types of solid tumors. We’ve received National Cancer Institute funding to study this approach with bevacizumab treatment, and we will also be investigating tumor delivery of chemotherapy and oxygen status using combined MR/PET techniques at the Martinos Center’s MR/PET facility.”

Jain adds, “We originally introduced the normalization hypothesis for anti-angiogenic treatment in 2001, but it’s taken more than a decade to confirm that vascular normalization actually increases tumor perfusion and that increased perfusion, rather than tumor starvation, is what improves survival. This study provides compelling evidence that normalization-induced increased vessel perfusion is the mechanism of benefit in glioblastoma patients.” Jain is the Cook Professor of Radiation Oncology (Tumor Biology), and Batchelor is the Armenise-Harvard Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School.

###

Co-lead authors of the PNAS Early Edition report are Elizabeth Gerstner, MD, MGH Neurology; Kyrre Emblem, PhD, Martinos Center; and Dan Duda, PhD, DMD, Steele Laboratory. Additional co-authors include Jay Loeffler, MD, MGH Radiation Oncology; Bruce Rosen, MD, PhD, Martinos Center; Gregory Sorensen, MD, formerly of the Martinos Center and now with Siemens Healthcare; Patrick Wen, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Percy Ivy, MD, National Cancer Institute. Support for the study includes National Institutes of Health grants R01CA129371, K24CA125440A, P01CA080124 and R01CA163815, and a grant from the National Foundation for Cancer Research.

Massachusetts General Hospital, founded in 1811, is the original and largest teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. The MGH conducts the largest hospital-based research program in the United States, with an annual research budget of more than $775 million and major research centers in AIDS, cardiovascular research, cancer, computational and integrative biology, cutaneous biology, human genetics, medical imaging, neurodegenerative disorders, regenerative medicine, reproductive biology, systems biology, transplantation biology and photomedicine.



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Imaging studies may predict tumor response to anti-angiogenic drugs

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

4-Nov-2013

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Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Study confirms that vascular normalization is the way these drugs improve patient survival

Advanced imaging techniques may be able to distinguish which patients’ tumors will respond to treatment with anti-angiogenic drugs and which will not. In patients newly diagnosed with the dangerous brain tumor glioblastoma, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers report, those for whom treatment with the anti-angiogenic drug cediranib rapidly ‘normalized’ abnormal blood vessels around their tumors and increased blood flow within tumors survived significantly longer than did patients in whom cediranib did not increase blood flow. The report appears in PNAS Early Edition.

“Two recent phase III trials of another anti-angiogenic drug, bevacizumab, showed no improvement in overall survival for glioblastoma patients, but our study suggests that only a subset of such patients will really benefit from these drugs,” explains Tracy Batchelor, MD, director of the Pappas Center for Neuro-Oncology at the MGH Cancer Center and co-lead and corresponding author of the current study. “Our results also verify that normalization of tumor vasculature appears to be the way that anti-angiogenic drugs enhance the activity of chemotherapy and radiation treatment.”

Anti-angiogenic drugs, which block the action of factors that stimulate the growth of blood vessels, were first introduced for cancer treatment under the theory that they would act by ‘starving’ tumors of their blood supply. Since that time, however, new evidence has suggested that the drugs’ benefits come through their ability to ‘normalize’ the abnormal, leaky vessels that usually surround and penetrate tumors, improving delivery of both chemotherapy drugs and the oxygen that is required for effective radiation therapy. This hypothesis was first proposed and has subsequently been developed by Rakesh Jain, PhD, senior author of the current study and director of the Steele Laboratory for Tumor Biology in the MGH Department of Radiation Oncology.

A 2007 clinical study led by Batchelor found evidence suggesting that cediranib, which has not yet received FDA approval, could temporarily normalize tumor vasculature in recurrent glioblastoma, but it was not clear what role normalization might have in patients’ survival. In the past few years, several research teams with leadership from Batchelor, Jain and other co-authors of the current paper reported evidence that cediranib alone improved blood perfusion within recurrent glioblastoma tumors in a subset of patients and improved their survival. A Nature Medicine study published earlier this year used a technique called vessel architectural imaging (VAI), developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH, to reveal that cediranib on its own improved the delivery of oxygen within tumors of some patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

Patients in the current study were participants in a clinical trial of cediranib plus radiation and chemotherapy for postsurgical treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Among participants in that trial, 40 also had advanced brain imaging with VAI and other MR imaging techniques. While all but one of the participants in the overall trial showed some evidence of vascular normalization and reduced edema tissue swelling that can be dangerous within the brain of the 40 who had imaging studies, only 20 were found to have persistent improvement in vessel perfusion. VAI also revealed improved oxygen delivery only in the patients with improved perfusion. Those patients ended up surviving about 9 months longer 26 months, compared with 17 months than did those whose perfusion levels remained stable or worsened. A comparison group of glioblastoma patients treated with radiation and chemotherapy only survived an average of 14 months.

“It’s quite likely that the results we’ve found with cediranib will apply to other anti-angiogenics,” Batchelor says. “In fact a presentation at a recent meeting showed that patients with improved perfusion from bevacizumab were also the ones in that study who lived longer. More research is needed, but these findings suggest that MR imaging techniques should play an essential role in future studies of anti-angiogenic drugs in glioblastoma and possibly other types of solid tumors. We’ve received National Cancer Institute funding to study this approach with bevacizumab treatment, and we will also be investigating tumor delivery of chemotherapy and oxygen status using combined MR/PET techniques at the Martinos Center’s MR/PET facility.”

Jain adds, “We originally introduced the normalization hypothesis for anti-angiogenic treatment in 2001, but it’s taken more than a decade to confirm that vascular normalization actually increases tumor perfusion and that increased perfusion, rather than tumor starvation, is what improves survival. This study provides compelling evidence that normalization-induced increased vessel perfusion is the mechanism of benefit in glioblastoma patients.” Jain is the Cook Professor of Radiation Oncology (Tumor Biology), and Batchelor is the Armenise-Harvard Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School.

###

Co-lead authors of the PNAS Early Edition report are Elizabeth Gerstner, MD, MGH Neurology; Kyrre Emblem, PhD, Martinos Center; and Dan Duda, PhD, DMD, Steele Laboratory. Additional co-authors include Jay Loeffler, MD, MGH Radiation Oncology; Bruce Rosen, MD, PhD, Martinos Center; Gregory Sorensen, MD, formerly of the Martinos Center and now with Siemens Healthcare; Patrick Wen, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Percy Ivy, MD, National Cancer Institute. Support for the study includes National Institutes of Health grants R01CA129371, K24CA125440A, P01CA080124 and R01CA163815, and a grant from the National Foundation for Cancer Research.

Massachusetts General Hospital, founded in 1811, is the original and largest teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. The MGH conducts the largest hospital-based research program in the United States, with an annual research budget of more than $775 million and major research centers in AIDS, cardiovascular research, cancer, computational and integrative biology, cutaneous biology, human genetics, medical imaging, neurodegenerative disorders, regenerative medicine, reproductive biology, systems biology, transplantation biology and photomedicine.



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AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/mgh-ism110113.php
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Suspect in LAX shooting spree targeted TSA

This photo provided by the FBI shows Paul Ciancia, 23. Accused of opening fire inside the Los Angeles airport, Ciancia was determined to lash out at the Transportation Security Administration, saying in a note that he wanted to kill at least one TSA officer and didn’t care which one, authorities said Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/FBI)

This photo provided by the FBI shows Paul Ciancia, 23. Accused of opening fire inside the Los Angeles airport, Ciancia was determined to lash out at the Transportation Security Administration, saying in a note that he wanted to kill at least one TSA officer and didn’t care which one, authorities said Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/FBI)

ALTERNATE HORIZONTAL CROP – This June, 2013 photo released by the Hernandez family Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, shows Transportation Security Administration officer Gerardo Hernandez. Hernandez, 39, was shot to death and several others wounded by a gunman who went on a shooting rampage in Terminal 3 at Los Angeles International Airport Friday. (AP Photo/Courtesy Hernandez Family)

John S. Pistole, left, Administrator of Transportation Security Administration and Ana Fernandez, center, wife of TSA agent Gerardo Fernandez, victim at LAX shooting, before a press conference in Porter Ranch, Calif. on Saturday Nov. 2, 2013. A gunman armed with a semi-automatic rifle opened fire at Los Angeles International Airport on Friday, killing a Transportation Security Administration employee and wounding two other people in an attack that frightened passengers and disrupted flights nationwide. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

Transportation Security Administration employees classify the luggage to return to passengers at Los Angeles International Airport’s Terminal 3 on Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013. A gunman armed with a semi-automatic rifle opened fire at the airport on Friday, killing a Transportation Security Administration employee and wounding two other people in an attack that frightened passengers and disrupted flights nationwide. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

From left to right, FBI Special Agent in Charge David L. Bowdich, United States Attorney Andre Birotte Jr., and Los Angeles Police Department Commander Andrew Smith in press conference to provide an update on the investigation of the shooting incident at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), on Saturday Nov. 2, 2013 at Westwood Federal Building in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

(AP) — Seeking to stir fear in “traitorous minds,” a man suspected of a shooting spree at Los Angeles airport allegedly set out to kill employees of the Transportation Security Administration in the attack that left one person dead and others wounded, authorities said.

At a news conference Saturday announcing charges against Paul Ciancia, U.S. Attorney Andre Birotte Jr. spelled out a chilling chain of events at LAX that began when he strode into Terminal 3 Friday morning, pulled a Smith & Wesson .223-caliber assault rifle from his duffel bag and fired repeatedly at point-blank range at a TSA officer. The officer was checking IDs and boarding passes at the base of an escalator leading to the main screening area.

After shooting a TSA officer and going up an escalator, Ciancia turned back to see the officer move and returned to finish him off, according to surveillance video reviewed by investigators.

Investigators said Ciancia, an unemployed motorcycle mechanic, fired on at least two other uniformed TSA employees and an airline passenger, who were all wounded. Airport police eventually shot him as panicked passengers cowered in stores and restaurants.

Ciancia, 23, remained hospitalized Saturday after being hit four times and wounded in the mouth and leg. The FBI said he was unresponsive and they had not been able to interview him.

The duffel bag also contained a handwritten letter signed by Ciancia stating he’d “made the conscious decision to try to kill” multiple TSA employees and that he wanted to “instill fear in their traitorous minds” said FBI Agent in Charge David L. Bowdich.

Federal prosecutors filed charges of first-degree murder of a federal officer and committing violence at an international airport. The charges could qualify him for the death penalty.

The FBI was still looking into Ciancia’s past, but investigators said they had not found evidence of previous crimes or any run-ins with the TSA. They said he had never applied for a job with the agency.

Authorities believe someone dropped Ciancia off at the airport. Agents were reviewing surveillance tapes to piece together the sequence of events.

“We are really going to draw a picture of who this person was, his background, his history. That will help us explain why he chose to do what he did,” Bowdich said. “At this point, I don’t have the answer on that.”

The note found in the duffel bag suggested Ciancia was willing to kill almost any TSA officer.

“Black, white, yellow, brown, I don’t discriminate,” the note read, according to a paraphrase by a law enforcement official briefed on the investigation. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly.

The screed also mentioned “fiat currency” and “NWO,” possible references to the New World Order, a conspiracy theory that foresees a totalitarian one-world government.

When searched, the suspect had five 30-round magazines, and his bag contained hundreds more rounds in boxes, the law-enforcement official said.

Terminal 3, the area where the shooting happened, reopened Saturday. Passengers who had abandoned luggage to escape Friday’s gunfire were allowed to return to collect their bags.

The TSA planned to review its security policies in the wake of the attack. Administrator John Pistole did not say if that would mean arming officers.

As airport operations returned to normal, a few more details trickled out about Ciancia, who by all accounts was reserved and solitary.

Former classmates barely remember him and even a recent roommate could say little about the young man who moved from New Jersey to Los Angeles less than two years ago. A former classmate at Salesianum School in Wilmington, Del., said Ciancia was incredibly quiet.

“He kept to himself and ate lunch alone a lot,” David Hamilton told the Los Angeles Times. “I really don’t remember any one person who was close to him …. In four years, I never heard a word out of his mouth.”

On Friday, Ciancia’s father called police in New Jersey, worried about his son in L.A. The young man had sent texts to his family that suggested he might be in trouble, at one point even saying goodbye.

The call came too late. Ten minutes earlier, police said, he had walked into the airport.

In the worrisome messages, the younger Ciancia did not mention suicide or hurting others, but his father had heard from a friend that his son may have had a gun, said Allen Cummings, police chief in Pennsville, a small blue-collar town near the Delaware River where Ciancia grew up.

The police chief called Los Angeles police, who sent a patrol car to Ciancia’s apartment. There, two roommates said that they had seen him a day earlier and he had appeared to be fine.

But by that time, gunfire was already breaking out at the airport.

“There’s nothing we could do to stop him,” Cummings said.

The police chief said he learned from Ciancia’s father that the young man had attended a technical school in Florida, then moved to Los Angeles in 2012 hoping to get a job as a motorcycle mechanic. He was having trouble finding work.

Ciancia graduated in December 2011 from Motorcycle Mechanics Institute in Orlando, Fla., said Tina Miller, a spokeswoman for Universal Technical Institute, the Scottsdale, Ariz., company that runs the school.

A basic motorcycle mechanic course takes about a year, she said.

On Friday, as swarms of passengers dropped to the ground or ran for their lives, the gunman seemed to ignore anyone except TSA targets.

Leon Saryan of Milwaukee had just passed through security and was looking for a place to put his shoes and belt back on when he heard gunfire. He managed to hide in a store. As he was cowering in the corner, the shooter approached.

“He looked at me and asked, ‘TSA?’ I shook my head no, and he continued on down toward the gate,” Saryan said.

Authorities identified the dead TSA officer as Gerardo I. Hernandez, 39, the first official in the agency’s 12-year history to be killed in the line of duty.

Friends remembered him as a doting father and a good neighbor who went door-to-door warning neighbors to be careful after his home was burglarized.

In brief remarks outside the couple’s house, his widow, Ana Hernandez, said Saturday that her husband came to the U.S. from El Salvador at age 15.

“He took pride in his duty for the American public and for the TSA mission,” she said.

___

Associated Press writers Alicia Chang in Los Angeles and Geoff Mulvihill in New Jersey contributed to this report.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-11-03-US-LAX-Shooting/id-2478a1ed496840c383cdfccd7440fe06
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